Falls are common in seniors, but are they different between men and women?

Figure 1. Snapshots from video footage of falls experienced by: (A) a 77-year old woman who tripped during walking. She fell forward but rotated during descent to land the right side of her pelvis and torso; (B) an 86-year old man who lost balance by sliding off a chair while seated. He fell forward, used his hands to arrest the fall, and rotated his body during descent to land sideways.
Figure 2. Comparison of fall characteristics of men vs. women (n = 529, with 1738 falls). An Odds Ratio (middle dot of each line) larger than 1 represents a higher risk of falling due to the activity or cause of imbalance among men compared to women. An Odds Raito lower than 1 represents a lower risk. Red color refers to statistically significant.

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Active Aging Research Team @ UBC

Active Aging Research Team @ UBC

Empowering people to live independent, active and connected lives as they age. Community-based research and evaluation team at University of British Columbia.